11 May 2017

Should you use an app to help that client?

Should you use an app to help that client?

As the use of mental health and behavioral apps grows, psychologists must weigh their benefits and limitations

Today there are more than 165,000 health-related apps worldwide, helping users track their diet and exercise, monitor their moods and even manage chronic diseases, according to a 2015 report by the IMS Institute for Healthcare Informatics. Nearly 30 percent of these apps are dedicated to mental health. While the apps present new opportunities for psychologists to boost patient support and supplement the therapeutic relationship, their sheer number and variety can make it difficult for psychologists to determine which are the most effective, safest and most useful.

"There's been an explosion of apps, and clinicians don't have time to keep up with all of them," says Stephen Schueller, PhD, a clinical psychologist at Northwestern University's Center for Behavioral Intervention Technologies. "It's not their job and it's impossible for them to do it."

But since one in five Americans uses these apps, staying informed about broad trends in app use is important for psychologists, says David Luxton, PhD, co-author of "A Practitioner's Guide to Telemental Health" (APA, 2016).

"If you're not familiar with these technologies today as a clinician, it's time to start paying attention because our patients are demanding them," he says.

Why use apps?

Many practitioners find that mental health apps are a valuable adjunct to psychotherapy because they allow therapists to maintain a better connection with their patients and improve their ability to track clients' symptoms and moods. Some of the most widely used of these apps include T2 Mood Tracker, developed by the National Center for Telehealth and Technology (T2), and Optimism Online, a mood charting app that allows clinicians to monitor client entries and receive alerts to help catch problems as they arise.

San Francisco-based clinical psychologist Keely Kolmes, PsyD, says that many of her clients prefer apps to the paper-based tools that she's used in her practice for years, for recording thoughts and tracking moods.

"Apps help prompt my clients to log things like their mood or whether they exercised or drank alcohol or slept well, so that I can have an accurate picture of their week, as opposed to them trying to reconstruct things on paper the day before therapy or during therapy, which is much less reliable," she says.

Apps are also available to patients 24 hours a day, seven days a week, and can be a great source of educational information, particularly at times when a client's clinician is unavailable. These include several apps by T2, such as PTSD Coach and CPT Coach, as well as Day to Day, which delivers a daily stream of advice, support and other information throughout the day to boost a user's mood. Day to Day is one of 14 apps included in IntelliCare, a suite of apps developed by Northwestern University's Center for Behavioral Intervention Technologies that target depression and anxiety arising from various causes.

While more research is needed, several studies indicate that the use of health apps can also improve patient outcomes and satisfaction. A 2015 meta-analysis led by Harvard Medical School psychiatrist John Torous, MD, for example, looked at 10 studies examining the use of apps in the treatment of mood disorders. The analysis found that patients who used these apps reported improved depressive symptoms (Internet Interventions, 2015). And a 2013 study led by University of New South Wales psychologist Tara Donker, PhD, found that participants who used apps reported the apps were a useful way to get self-help for mental health concerns and disorders (Journal of Medical Internet Research, 2013).

Apps can also help clinicians gather data about their practice, says APA's director of legal and regulatory affairs, Stacey Larson, PsyD, JD. For example, several apps provide HIPAA-compliant note-taking (such as Insight Notes and Mobile Therapy) and can generate graphs or tables showing client improvement as well as areas that still needed to be worked on. "A provider can use them to help determine which interventions are working best and which should be changed, and this information can be shown individually or charted for a practitioner's whole practice, to determine how interventions are working more broadly across their patient population," Larson says.

Potential limitations

Despite their popularity, behavioral health apps are not regulated and many are not research-based, says Marlene Maheu, PhD, executive director of the Telemental Health Institute in San Diego.

"We're scientists—we need to have evidence that something works before we use it with our clients," she says.

Schueller agrees, and encourages clinicians to look for apps that come with documentation of the evidence on which they are based, including research on the intervention underlying the app, such as cognitive-behavioral therapy, as well as research specifically associated with the app itself.

"The most reputable apps are generally those affiliated with academic research institutions or government funding agencies, as they are the most likely to detail the app development and validation process," he says. (See list below.)

Patient privacy and security concerns also need to be addressed any time technology is used in clinical practice. Some apps, for example, allow communication between therapists and patients between sessions—a feature some therapists might want and others might not—and it's crucial that this communication be HIPAA compliant, Maheu says. It's also important for providers to understand what, if any, data are being collected when a patient uses an app, and to make sure patients are informed about this, Larson says.

"Mobile mental health apps can be either passive or active," she explains. "Active apps require direct participation from the patient—such as completing mood logs, self-symptom ratings or recording personal experiences, but passive apps are able to access information independently and gather data through smartphone functions such as GPS without the patient or provider even noticing. Though it may be beneficial, some people may not like the potential invasion of privacy associated with this type of data gathering." And Schueller advises clinicians to show patients how to put a screen lock or password on their phones for additional security.

Integrating apps into your practice

With all of these limitations in mind, how can practitioners ensure the best use of apps in practice? Schueller recommends asking colleagues how they may use apps in therapy, and posting questions on listservs to find out what others have found works best. Several organizations provide resources and reviews of mobile health apps, to help clinicians stay abreast of the most effective and safest technologies. (See list below.) APA and the Center for Technology in Behavioral Science also hosted a webinar in May exploring the role of apps in clinical practice. The organizations received an overwhelming response to the one-hour event, with more than 1,700 clinicians registering for the event, says Maheu, CTiBS president and CEO. Two more webinars are being scheduled for the fall. It's also imperative that psychologists take time to test an app themselves before endorsing it with their clients, Luxton says.

"Install it and try out every single possible scenario inside that app so that you know it very well," he says. And always get feedback from patients on how an app is working for them, Schueller says. "As you start to learn more about which apps are really resonating with the population of clients you're working with, it will help get your practice more in line with what your clients want."

And most important, he adds, clinicians must be mindful of how apps fit into the goals of therapy. "Apps are not a panacea," Schueller says. "There's a lot of enthusiasm here and some of it is warranted. But be cautious; they will not completely fix everything."

APA does not endorse any of the apps mentioned in this article.

Mobile health app resources

By Amy Novotney


This article was originally published in the November 2016 Monitor on Psychology

Did you find this article useful?

0 0
04 May 2017

New CEO Talks About Future of APA

New CEO Talks About Future of APA

Just two weeks after Arthur C. Evans, PhD, took the helm of APA, he was thrust onto a stage in front of more than 450 APA staff members to talk about his vision for the association. He surprised the audience with a multiple-choice quiz about his favorite food and musical performer (lasagna and Dolly Parton, in case you were wondering) but he also sent a clear message: APA’s next chapter will be focused on making psychologists and psychology more visible to the general public.

“In my experience, people have a very limited view of psychology,” Evans said in an interview shortly after his first day as chief executive officer of APA. “They don’t understand the full range of research and science in the discipline. They should know the full impact of what we do, whether it’s in the media, in Congress or at the state level.”

Injecting psychology into the national conversation about public health and wellness is not just about treating the individual, he says, but about focusing on how psychology can have an impact on communities and society, making it relevant to people of all backgrounds.

Similarly, he says, being a member of APA is important for psychologists to feel connected and heard. “There are a lot of benefits of APA – the networking, the publications,” he said. “I’m interested in how to use the existing infrastructure and bring it into the age of Google and Amazon and Apple and make it really easy for people to benefit from all the resources we have.”

Before APA, Evans spent 12 years as commissioner of Philadelphia’s Department of Behavioral Health and Intellectual disAbility Services, where he was widely recognized for transforming the city’s mental health system, improving its efficiency and changing lives. He invested heavily in empirically supported treatments and worked to implement evidence-based practices. At APA, he would like to continue finding ways to focus on and emphasize the science of the field. “I’d like to reach out to the science community who left APA or have elected not to join because they don’t perceive it as a place for them. I want every psychologist, no matter what they do, to feel like this is the place they should be.” 

And he’s already making sure psychologists’ voices are heard. At the recent round of consolidated meetings in Washington, D.C., Evans encouraged members to speak up about their work, and will continue to do that as he travels around the country and the world on behalf of APA and psychology. “I talked with different groups and asked them, ‘Do people know you’re doing this?’ We need to make sure the public understands it’s coming from APA and our field.”

In a new age of health care, psychologists cannot afford not to be part of the discussion, he says, whether it’s about research funding or prevention. “Right now, our health care system is only set up to deal with people after a diagnosis. There are tremendous opportunities for psychologists in population health to prevent health problems.”

As APA celebrates its 125th anniversary, Evans also wants to make sure the association stays on top of the latest trends in psychology, including emerging technologies, such as mental health apps, artificial intelligence and big data. “We cannot miss an opportunity to be a part of this research. We have to be on the leading edge.”

13 Mar 2017

A Collection of Social Psychology Articles from APA Journals

A Collection of Social Psychology Articles from APA Journals

Social psychology is the study of how individuals affect and are affected by other people and by their social and physical environments. The work of social psychologists allows us to have a better grasp of how group dynamics influence our choices and actions and provides insight into how our social perceptions affect our interactions with other people.

This booklet, A Collection of Social Psychology Articles from APA Journals, features a broad selection of 2015 and 2016 articles from some of the most influential scholars and cutting-edge scientific researchers in social psychology. Article topics include, nature of empathy, goal attainment, parental overaspiration and more.

APA’s Journals Department houses thousands of academic papers and scholarly works on the most important topics in psychology. If you want to stay up to speed on the latest work from your peers, you can learn more about APA’s scientific journal offerings on our website (http://www.apa.org/pubs/journals/).

Did you find this booklet interesting or useful?

26 2
09 Dec 2016

Consider an Alternative Funding Method for Your Research

Consider an Alternative Funding Method for Your Research

The cost of research can be high, and funding opportunities for research studies are competitive. With the ever-growing presence of crowdfunding resources on the Internet, for purposes ranging from creative projects to personal medical expenses, why not take advantage of crowdfunding for academic research? Here are a few venues for this alternative method of research funding:

Experiment.com

Experiment.com, an internet crowdfunding source for the specific purpose of scientific research, comprises a community of over 66,000 members and a display of over 60 experiments. This resource remains available to anyone who wishes to submit a study for the public solicitation of donations.

Experiment.com boasts a success rate of 48%, and shares stories (and data results) of research projects that have been successfully completed after having raised all of the necessary funding.

Chuffed.org

Chuffed.org hosts funding campaigns for organizations and charities devoted to social causes. Why not post your own research project to solicit funding? If you are able to communicate a clear outcome for your research funding purpose, you will likely be eligible to run a campaign on Chuffed.org.

According to Chuffed.org, the site’s campaigns raise an average of $7,000, and their largest campaign to date raised $345,000.

Unlike most crowdfunding sites, Chuffed.org does not charge any fees for campaigns. Donors pay the processing fees for their donation, at no cost to you. Also, Chuffed.org allows you to keep your funds, even if you don’t hit your fundraising goal. Partial funding for research can go a long way!

#SciFund Challenge

#SciFund Challenge not only provides a crowdfunding platform specifically for the funding of research, but also offers a wide range of resources, such as tools for outreach to publicize your research.

In 2014, #SciFund Challenge enjoyed a success rate of almost 70% for their funded projects. [1]

While many #SciFund Challenge projects are ecologically oriented, there is no rule that states they all must be. Anyone with a research project in the social sciences may sign up for their free newsletters, informational service, and crowdfunding resources.

If you are considering submitting proposals for research funding, visit https://experiment.com/, http://www.chuffed.org, or https://scifundchallenge.org/ to view their terms and regulations to see if these innovative alternative methods of funding work for you!


[1] Faulkes Z. #SciFund round 4 analysis. 2014. http://scifundchallenge.org/blog/2014/03/18/scifund-round-4-analysis/.

Did you find this article useful?

4 0
06 Oct 2016

Emerging Career Paths for Research Psychologists

This 30-minute webinar discusses ways in which research psychologists like you have broadened their career options by taking the path less traveled.

Learn more about:
• Thinking beyond as “academic” vs. “non-academic”
• Opportunities to support psychological science and conduct research
• Practical tips, like skills assessment, coaching, and networking
• How to “test drive” a career

…and more!

Presenter Bio:

Amber L. Story, PhD, is the Executive Associate Director for Scientific Affairs within the Science Directorate of APA. Story earned her PhD in Social Psychology from Cornell University and then served as a post-doctoral research scholar on an NIMH training grant at the University of Michigan’s Institute for Social Research. She served on the faculty of the University of South Carolina-Aiken and the George Washington University, where she studied self- and social judgments, and the factors that influence accuracy and bias in those judgments.

Moderator Bio:

Garth A. Fowler is an Associate Executive Director for Education, and the Director of the Office for Graduate and Postgraduate Education and Training at APA. He leads the Directorate’s efforts to develop resources, guidelines, and policies that promote and enhance disciplinary education and training in psychology at the graduate and postdoctoral level. He has served as a consultant for universities and research institutions on program development and assessment, creating learning outcome for graduate and postdoctoral training, creation of career and professional development resources, submitting federal training grants, and teaching responsible conduct of research.

Did you find this webinar useful?

0 0
18 Sep 2016

Emerging Career Paths for Clinical Practitioners

This 30-minute webinar discusses ways in which clinicians like you have broadened their career options by taking the path less traveled.

Learn more about:

• Creating opportunities in emerging practice areas
• Maximizing your full scope of practice and training
• Practical tips and resources for exploring innovative paths

…and more!

Presenter Bio:

Vaile Wright is Director of Research and Special Projects in the Practice Research and Policy office at APA. Their office focuses on the development and implementation of programs and policies related to expanding opportunities for professional psychology, including projects aimed at increasing access to psychological services for the public through the integration of psychology in the health care delivery system. She received her PhD in psychology from the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign in 2007, and is licensed in the District of Columbia.

Moderator Bio:

Garth A. Fowler is an Associate Executive Director for Education, and the Director of the Office for Graduate and Postgraduate Education and Training at APA. He leads the Directorate’s efforts to develop resources, guidelines, and policies that promote and enhance disciplinary education and training in psychology at the graduate and postdoctoral level. He has served as a consultant for universities and research institutions on program development and assessment, creating learning outcome for graduate and postdoctoral training, creation of career and professional development resources, submitting federal training grants, and teaching responsible conduct of research.

Did you find this webinar useful?

0 0
03 Aug 2016

The Life-Changing Power of Mentors

The Life-Changing Power of Mentors

Midcareer psychologists talk about the mentors who shaped their careers.

Selecting a mentor can be one of life's most important decisions. "Mentors are crucial whenever people are faced with new phases of their career or life that require the development of new knowledge, skills or attitudes," says mentoring expert Drew Appleby, PhD, professor emeritus at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis. "Mentors help people determine who they want to become, how they must change in order to become these people, and how they can take advantage of their college or work experiences to bring about these changes."

Mentoring takes many different forms, ranging from the formal arrangement between a student and adviser in graduate school to informal relationships people develop throughout their careers. Midcareer mentoring is often informal and starts somewhat spontaneously, Appleby says. "You may meet someone, have a conversation and suddenly realize you'd like to be like this person," he says. "If this person shows a genuine interest in you, that is an ideal way for mentoring to begin."

Psychology practitioner Jean Carter, PhD, of Washington, D.C., says a variety of mentors helped her navigate such important transitions as selecting a graduate school and moving from a shared space to her own office.

"Informal mentoring can be a single meeting, episodic or ongoing," Carter says. "It can be as simple as one time when you talked to someone who gave you an insight that influenced your career. If you are open to those mentoring moments, they are more likely to happen."

The Monitor interviewed five midcareer psychologists for insights on how they found their mentors, how their mentors helped them succeed and how they are paying it forward by mentoring others.

Kavita Murthy, PhD: counseling psychologist in Austin, Texas

How did you meet your mentor?

 

Kavita Murthy, PhD (credit: Eric Coleman)
Kavita Murthy, PhD

I met my mentor Larry Bugen about 13 years ago when my colleague and I were interested in starting a private practice. We were looking for office space when Larry, a well-known couples psychologist, was downsizing his practice. Friends connected us. As I shared office space with Larry, we got to know one another and started to realize how much we thought alike. He was 20 years older than me, so there was that affection of a fatherly figure and I looked up to him, but it never felt like a superior-inferior relationship. It was more like we were equals.

 

How did your mentor help you succeed?

Larry had a lot of confidence in me and believed in me when I wasn't able to believe in myself. One year, for example, I gave a talk at the Texas Psychological Association's annual meeting about couples therapy and trauma, and he sat in on my two-hour workshop. After it was over, he told me it was a good workshop, but I had deferred too much to other people's work during the talk. He encouraged me to believe in my own ideas and theories and spend more time on that.

He also wasn't afraid to share with me the mistakes that he made from time to time. When I was hesitant to take on a couple due to the potential legal issues involved, he would share what he would have done differently when he took on a case that was similar. When I felt too biased toward one person in a couple, he would tell stories of when it happened to him. He also taught me that it's OK to make mistakes, and that I could get through any mistake if I worked to repair it.

How are you paying it forward by mentoring others?

I have taught various counseling classes and practicum courses at the St. Edward's University master's of counseling program in Austin, which gives me an opportunity to supervise people who are working in the field. I always choose to teach in an experiential way and I'm not afraid to show my own vulnerabilities and mistakes. Larry taught me to be real, and that's how I want to be with mentees. During the live demonstrations, I try to give positive and encouraging feedback rather than simply pointing out what they've done wrong.

Now I'm entering a phase of life in which people are starting to seek me out to be their mentor, and that is a new thing for me. Mentoring others inspires confidence and wisdom in my skills as a therapist. I cannot believe I've been on this journey for 20 years. It's time to give back and I am eager to do so.

Jane Halonen, PhD: professor of psychology, University of West Florida

How did you find a mentor?

Jane Halonen, PhD (credit: Silver Image/Michael Spooneybarger)
Jane Halonen, PhD

I met my mentor in the library. When I got my first teaching job, I had zero background and didn't really know what I was doing. Out of desperation, I went to the library and found a book by Bill McKeachie called "McKeachie's Teaching Tips," and every problem I ran into he addressed in that book. I started having personal contact with him when I joined a grant for a book that was looking at critical thinking in psychology. When it was time to do the acknowledgements, I approached him and he said, "Of course." I ended up interviewing him for a later book project, and we bonded in a way that made me feel like the person who was the most knowledgeable about teaching was in my court. He was not only exquisitely smart about teaching, but also a very humble and gentle human being.

How did your mentor help you succeed?

Bill has an incredible capacity to help people get excited about learning, and that is something I adopted. He also reinforced the importance of making things better in the classroom and this helped me find a niche of scholarship that was satisfying to me. Before this, research seemed like more of an obligation, but he showed me that collecting data about how students learn is really interesting.

Bill also taught me that even as the professor, I didn't have to be the smartest person in the room. If I didn't know the answer to a question, I could just say, "I don't know." I found that advice so liberating. I use such moments to elicit student opinions and point out the opportunity to think critically.

How are you paying it forward by mentoring others?

When I see people who are excited about teaching, I try to show them helpful resources, such as the APA Div. 2 Office of Teaching Resources in Psychology. For new faculty in my department, I take them to lunch and let them know I'm happy to answer any questions.

Career development is also becoming a higher priority in undergraduate education. So, I teach my students how to be good critical thinkers, but I also recognize that I am getting them ready for the workforce. I take seriously the fact that the majority of my students are not going to graduate school, and I incorporate activities to prepare them for things like job interviews.

Marietta Collins, PhD: associate professor, psychiatry and behavioral sciences, Emory University School of Medicine in Atlanta

How did you find a mentor?

Marietta Collins, PhD (credit: Michael Schwarz)
Marietta Collins, PhD

I was in my third year of graduate school when I applied for a research assistantship with Nadine Kaslow, who worked in psychiatry and behavioral sciences. We shared an interest in providing mental health services for underserved populations, which had not been an emphasis in my clinical psychology program. I hadn't been able to find a mentor, and she was someone I could connect with. She was a very open and available person. She was also interested in helping me figure out where I wanted to go professionally and how to get there.

How did she help you succeed?

Nadine believed in me and encouraged me in a way that nobody else ever had. I was an African-American in a predominantly Caucasian field, and she believed there was a place for me not only as an African-American, but also as a researcher focused on underserved populations. She was one of the first non-African-Americans I felt I could talk openly with about race issues.

Nadine also created opportunities for me professionally. When she was writing an NIH grant about pediatric sickle cell disease, she invited me to be part of the process. Once she received funding, I helped with the study. This experience helped me when I went on to write grants of my own.

When I had my first child, she was also available to talk about the importance of being a mother and how to balance my career as a psychologist with being a parent. She helped me set goals and believe I could successfully navigate both of these roles.

How are you paying it forward by mentoring others?

When I was part of Nadine's research lab as a graduate student, I helped to bring other African-American students to the lab. I had the opportunity to supervise and mentor these students, interns and fellows. Once I was a faculty member, I formed the African-American Training Research Lab, which is a support group for African-American women in psychology. We have co-authored a couple of articles, including one about the importance of mentoring for African-American trainees in psychology. I also hold an annual potluck at my home for incoming minority trainees to give them an opportunity to network with one another and other minority faculty members.

Sue Frantz, PhD: psychology professor, Highline College in Washington

How did you find a mentor?

Sue Frantz, PhD (credit: Brian Smale)
Sue Frantz, PhD

I wasn't actively looking for a mentor when I met someone who turned out to be a mentor for me. I was working at Highline College when I was serving as the director of Project Syllabus for APA's Div. 2 (Society for the Teaching of Psychology). I had heard of Ruth Ault because she was the director of the Office of Teaching Resources in Psychology. I met her for the first time in Florida in 2005 because we were both readers for the AP psychology test. Throughout the week, we had time to socialize and she encouraged me to go to APA's Annual Convention. I thought the convention seemed overwhelming, but she suggested that I focus on division activities.

How did your mentor help you succeed?

When I attended my first convention, Ruth invited me to sit next to her at the division's annual meeting and introduced me to people. She helped me understand what Div. 2 was about, how APA works and who the people were in the organization. This background helped me move into leadership positions, such as a member and later a chair for the Committee for Psychology Teachers at Community Colleges. I also served on APA's Membership Board. Currently I'm vice president for resources for the division and a college representative for APA's Teachers of Psychology in Secondary Schools. When I was thinking about creating ToPIX (Teaching of Psychology Idea Exchange), a wiki of teaching resources, she provided valuable advice on how to move that idea forward.

How are you paying it forward by mentoring others?

I used to go to conferences with the goal of learning something new for myself. That's still a goal, but not the primary one. Now I want to meet people who are new to the profession to find out what they want to do. I have conversations about the starter opportunities in APA, like being a reviewer for different resources. In January, APA's Early Career Psychology Committee had a social, and I had wonderful conversations with several people. Five years ago, I also started a blog (SueFrantz.com) about technology you can use that is specifically geared for instructors. I started it because I think there are a lot of instructors doing things the hard way, and I wanted to share ideas with them.

Sue Frantz, PhD: psychology professor, Highline College in Washington

How did you find a mentor?

William Buskist, PhD (credit: Tracy McDaniel)
William Buskist, PhD

I was a graduate student at Brigham Young University in a new experimental psychology program when I found my mentor. Initially, I was involved in research on errorless learning, but I discovered I wasn't all that interested in it and switched major professors. I was intrigued by the work of a new professor in the department, Hal Miller, who was fresh from Harvard where he had worked with the matching law. He was interested in applying the matching law to human behavior and I switched to his lab. The more work I did in the area, the more fascinated I became with this line of research. I also enjoyed being around Hal — I liked his work ethic, the way he treated people and his interest in helping his students succeed in whatever they attempted to learn.

How did your mentor help you succeed?

Hal represented the kind of professional I wanted to become. He showed me it is important to take an interest in the individual, and modeled that by being extremely generous with his time. I fell in love with what I was doing as a graduate student, and I would wait for him to show up at his office nearly every morning because I was so eager to share what I was learning or my ideas for a new study. Even though I was probably a pest at the time, he took it in stride and always supported me.

He also encouraged me to take the next steps in my career. For example, we had replicated some research on birds with humans, and he suggested that I send my data to the author of the research we replicated. I eventually met the researcher and we stayed in touch, and that connection led me to my position here at Auburn University.

How are you paying it forward by mentoring others?

About eight years after I started at Auburn, the department chair asked me to help him revamp our introductory psychology course. At the time, the department was using only graduate students to teach the course. These first-time instructors had received no training for teaching and were unsupervised while they taught. He asked if I'd be interested in developing a training program for new graduate instructors. I created two graduate-level courses on teaching and a teaching fellows program. More than 100 graduate students have gone through the program and of those, seven have won national teaching awards.

Overall, I try to involve graduate students in every aspect of my work, and always publish graduate student co-authors. I get so much satisfaction from watching these students succeed, whether it's giving their first lecture, publishing research or landing their first job.

  • Reach out to a professor.
  • Attend APA's Annual Convention and approach someone with like interests.
  • Assist a researcher involved in a study that interests you.
  • Serve on an APA committee, board or project and network with people in the group.
  • Reach out to a practicing psychologist who has expertise in your specialty.
  • Explore APA resources that offer mentoring at www.apa.org/gradpsych/2005/01/mentor-find.aspx.
  • Think about what you need in a mentor and start looking for these qualities in people you meet.
  • Get involved in smaller state or local psychological associations.
  • Approach someone during a field placement while in graduate school.
  • Attend social gatherings offered by psychology departments or APA divisions that give you an opportunity to network.

By Heather Stringer


Interested in Mentorship? Read our collection of articles on Mentorship curated specially for APA members and affiliates.

Did you find this post useful?

2 0
28 Jul 2016

PsycIQ Quick Links: APA Funding Sources

PsycIQ Quick Links: APA Funding Sources

APA has a number of resources to help you find scholarships, funding, and awards for your work—and we've assembled them all in one place!

APA Scholarship, Grants and Awards Search Tool

  • Description: APA and its affiliate organizations provide a wide range of grants, scholarships and awards with the aim of advancing the science and practice of psychology as a means of understanding behavior and promoting health, education, and human welfare.
  • Why It's Great: Wide range of search criteria, including topics, sponsors, funding type, recipient classification, and deadline range.

American Psychological Foundation Funding

  • Description: The American Psychological Foundation is seeking to seed innovation through supporting projects and programs that use psychology to solve social problems. APF grants align with our mission of enhancing psychology to elevate the human condition and advance human potential. We offer grants for early career funding and seed grants for research and for targeted programs.
  • Why It's Great: Segmented presentation of awards by type and career phase, plus more robust search available.

APA Science Directorate Awards, Honors & Research Funding

  • Description: Each year, the Science Directorate honors researchers, students and departments in psychology through various awards and honors programs. The awards are intended for researchers from all subdisciplines of psychological science and contribute to our overall mission: to communicate, facilitate, promote and represent psychological science and scientists.
  • Why It's Great: APA awards segmented specifically for scientists and researchers, plus monthly updates sharing the latest federal research funding opportunities.

APA Public Interest Directorate Scholarships, Grants and Awards

  • Description: APA's Public Interest Directorate offers funding in many forms, from monetary awards to grants – for a wide variety of use, such as opportunities for early career research proposals, training, and conference attendance.
  • Why It's Great: Funding opportunities are listed by type, with links to more detailed descriptions of each opportunity available and a list of previous awardees.

APAGS Scholarships, Grants and Awards

  • Description: APAGS offers its members travel and training grants, research scholarships and recognition awards.
  • Why It's Great: Easy to find opportunities just for students, both within APA and from other esteemed organizations.

There are also several external sources you can use for scholarships, expenses, funding, and awards for your research. Learn more >>

Did you find this post useful?

0 1