01 Aug 2017

Game: Ghost Man

In this game you should move Ghost Man to eat all the foods in the maze, there will be a ghost chasing you and you should get away from them. There are also special power foods scattered throughout the maze and after you've eaten such foods, you will become invincible for a while and be able to eat the ghosts as well. The number of ghosts chasing you will increase as the game progresses.

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01 Aug 2017

APA 2016 Annual Report

APA 2016 Annual Report

As a psychologist and valued member of APA, your success depends on factors that go beyond your own hard work and expertise. You also need representation on the critical issues facing all of psychology in this time of uncertainty and change. You need access to tools and resources that help you keep pace with the developments in the field. With new leadership and a renewed focus on making your membership more relevant, APA offers what you need and is meeting the promise of our mission—to advance the creation, communication and application of psychological knowledge to benefit society and improve people’s lives.

As APA’s new CEO, I am pleased to announce the availability of the 2016 APA Annual Report, which reflects the excellent work and accomplishments of APA in 2016. In prior years, the APA Annual Report was mailed to you in hard copy, but now it is in digital format and conveniently accessible anytime and anywhere, with interactive features and videos. A short, downloadable pdf featuring highlights of the digital report is also available on the APA website.

The past year has brought both progress and accomplishments, and we think you’ll especially enjoy reading about these achievements in the report:

• The year in review, including the many ways APA supported its mission by educating the public about mental health and psychology’s scientific basis and by advocating for key federal policies and legislation
• The top initiatives APA delivered for psychology and psychologists in science, practice, public interest and education through its publications and databases, value-added products and national and international programs
• The APA treasurer’s report and financial statements

I hope you’ll delve into the details of this report to learn how APA made an impact in 2016 in ways that support your career, advance psychology and improve people’s lives.

Arthur C. Evans, Jr., PhD
Chief Executive Officer
American Psychological Association

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25 Jul 2017

How Did You Get That Job? A Q&A with Consultant Dr. Melanie Kinser

The knowledge, skills and experience gained through your psychology training can successfully transfer to a variety of jobs. As a consultant, Melanie Kinser, PhD, leverages her understanding of psychology and business to help leaders and safety professionals strengthen organizational culture and in turn, strengthen their bottom line. Learn how you can apply your psychology education to a similar career path.

Melanie Kinser, PhDSpeaker:
Melanie Kinser, PhD, focuses on translating complex topics into practical strategies that are realistic for her client's demanding work environments. Her clients include Fortune 500's, startups, and non-profits. She has partnered with organizations in the US, Canada and Australia in industries such as Technology, Healthcare, Energy, Pipeline Construction, Manufacturing, Higher Education and Nuclear. She has a Master’s and Doctorate in School Psychology from the University of Missouri. Dr. Kinser has published articles on organizational change and leadership development as well as presenting at several national conferences.

Garth Fowler, PhDHost:

Garth A. Fowler, PhD, is an Associate Executive Director for Education, and the Director of the Office for Graduate and Postgraduate Education and Training at APA. He leads the Directorate’s efforts to develop resources, guidelines, and policies that promote and enhance disciplinary education and training in psychology at the graduate and postdoctoral level.

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21 Jul 2017

Leadership: A Three-Part Series

Leadership: A Three-Part Series

In this 3-part web series, you'll learn the fundamentals of servant leadership, a leader or an organization that seeks first to serve others. The presentations cover effective communication, managing people and processes and positively transforming people and organizations. *This series is eligible for CE credit. Earn 1 CE credit for each session.

Each program runs about 1 hour:

Leadership and Communication

No communication skill is more important than listening. Knowing the basic barriers and shortfalls of communication and doing something about them is a big step in improving our ability to communicate effectively.

Leading and Managing People and Processes

In order to accomplish a mission, establishing a process is important. However, people complete the processes and ensure the mission is accomplished. Learn the importance of maintaining a dual focus on people and processes.

Leaders Implementing Positive Change

It takes strong leadership to help people and an organization transition in order to make a change. Change is the event, transition is the means of getting there. Learn what it takes to implement positive change by focusing on the transition process.

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20 Jul 2017

Leaders Implementing Positive Change

Leaders and managers should seek to positively transform people and organizations. Do not confuse the words “change” and “transition.” Change is the event, transition is the means of getting there. Certainly it takes a true vision to know where to go and the changes to make. But it takes strong leadership and management knowledge and skills to help the people and the organization transition in order to make the change. Communicator and leadership expert John A. Kline shares from his own experiences and those of others just what it takes to implement positive change by focusing on the transition process.

Learning Objective
Implement positive change.

John Kline, PhDPresenter
John A. Kline, (PhD, Iowa 1970) was a college professor, then from 1975-2000 the Air Force expert in Communication and Leadership. In 1986 he achieved Civilian (SES) status equivalent to a two-star general. From 1991 until 2000 he was the Air University Provost with responsibility for faculty, academic programs, libraries, technology, budget and support of 50,000 resident and 150,000 distance-learning students annually. Kline has written several books and many published articles, and is now the Distinguished Professor of Leadership and Director of the Troy University Institute for Leadership Development. He focuses on servant leadership and seeks to make a positive difference in the lives of others.

 

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18 Jul 2017

Membership Pavilion Activities for the 2017 APA Convention

Membership Pavilion Activities for the 2017 APA Convention

This year marks the 125th anniversary of APA’s founding, and today, more than ever, APA is committed to providing our members with the tools that they need to develop and sustain successful careers. At the same time, APA staff, alongside our volunteer member leaders, continue the critical work of advocating for the field, engaging the public with psychology and supporting educators and students. During your time in at the 2017 APA Annual Convention in Washington, DC,  please make sure to visit the APA Membership Pavilion in the Exhibit Hall, Booth #540, to take advantage of the following activities, offers and giveaways:

Headshots: Get your FREE professional headshot when you provide a written testimonial (a $200 value)

 

 

 

 

Your APA Story: Share with us in a video testimonial how APA has been beneficial and receive a $5 Starbucks card and RFID sleeve protector

 

 

 

 

Limited-Edition Gift: Renew your APA membership for 2018 and receive a premium, limited-edition gift

 

 

 

Prizes: Take the Membership Survey for a chance to Win a FREE trip to San Francisco, CA, for the 2018 APA Convention

 

 

 

 

PsycIQ: Discover the latest specialized content from our new member-focused website, PsycIQ

 

Tools: Test-drive the newest members-only tools and resources in the Interactive Membership Lab

 

IonTuition: Download this web-based service that helps you manage student loan repayment, it's free with your membership to APA

 

Charging Station: Mobile running low on battery power? Recharge your mobile device while learning about new products and benefits of APA membership

 

Benefit Partners: Learn about financial, business and travel discounts available exclusively to members

17 Jul 2017

Leading and Managing People and Processes

Some leaders and managers focus primarily on the process, task, or mission.  Others focus on the people. Which is best? The military phrase: “Mission First, People Always” says it well.  To be effective, those in charge must focus on both.  Obviously the mission must be accomplished, therefore, the process is important.  However, people complete the processes and ensure the mission is accomplished. Leaders and managers must have a dual focus. Communication and leadership expert John A. Kline, PhD, shares from his experience of managing and leading groups with a handful of people to organizations of thousands.

Learning Objective
Comprehend the importance of maintaining a dual focus on people and processes.

John Kline, PhDPresenter
John A. Kline, (PhD, Iowa 1970) was a college professor, then from 1975-2000 the Air Force expert in Communication and Leadership. In 1986 he achieved Civilian (SES) status equivalent to a two-star general. From 1991 until 2000 he was the Air University Provost with responsibility for faculty, academic programs, libraries, technology, budget and support of 50,000 resident and 150,000 distance-learning students annually. Kline has written several books and many published articles, and is now the Distinguished Professor of Leadership and Director of the Troy University Institute for Leadership Development. He focuses on servant leadership and seeks to make a positive difference in the lives of others.

 

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12 Jul 2017

Tips for Applying to Graduate School

Tips for Applying to Graduate School

Applying to graduate school can be a challenging process that requires effort, patience and time. However, there are many things you can do to overcome your anxiety about the application process. Here are some tips that APA gathered from recruiters and successful graduate students that can help bring you one step closer to acceptance at your dream school.

Find you perfect match

Selecting the graduate program in psychology that is best for you requires thoughtful consideration. First, think carefully about your career goals and training interests, then apply to programs with graduates that succeed in the types of jobs and training programs you are most interested in. In addition, make sure your previous education and training have prepared you for success in the program. As you review graduate programs, ask these questions:

  1. What is the profile of recently admitted students in terms of academic background, standardized test scores, research experience, work experience and demographic characteristics? Your profile should be similar to theirs to help ensure your acceptance to and success within the program.
  2. What is the program's success rate in terms of the percentage of admitted students who graduate, and what is the average number of years they required to do so?
  3. What are the goals and objectives of the program? Do they match your interests and academic preparation as a prospective graduate student?
  4. For programs with an emphasis on academic and research careers, what is the record of graduates' success in obtaining postdoctoral research fellowships, academic appointments or applied research positions outside a college or university setting?
  5. For programs that require an internship or practicum, what is the success rate of placement for students attending the program? What level of assistance is provided to students in obtaining practicum and internship placements?
  6. For programs with an emphasis on professional practice, what is the program's accreditation status (only applicable to clinical, counseling and school doctoral programs)? Are their graduates successful in obtaining licensure, in being selected for advanced practice residencies, and in getting jobs after they finish training?
  7. What types of financial assistance does each program offer?

Graduate school is more of a mentorship program, where students are required to conduct their own research. Therefore, graduate schools look not only for students who will do well in the program, but also for those who will benefit from the program and contribute to the research projects of the schools. Before you apply, make sure that the program is the best fit for you academically and financially. Research the program carefully so that you can find out whether you are the best fit for the program.

Settle Your Score:  GRE and GPA

Most graduate schools seek the best students who will match their programs and offer the most to the field. One approach they use to select these students is to consider students’ GPA and Graduate Record Examination (GRE) scores. Even though these are not the only elements graduate schools use to decide whether a student will be accepted to the program, they are usually the explicit cutoff point. Your awesome recommendation letter or experience will not be considered if your GRE and GPA score is below the required level. There are many things that you can do to prevent yourself from a GRE/ GPA crisis:

  1. Set a goal to get your GPA and GRE scores up to the level that the schools expect you to have. This will offer more opportunity for your recommendation letters and experience to be considered.
  2. It is always smart to start early. You will never realize how difficult and time-consuming the GRE can be until you begin your learning process. Therefore, plan to study for the GRE early, so that you will be well prepared despite other unexpected factors that might affect your plan.
  3. Ask other students to study for the GRE with you. Having a partner can motivate you to be more serious with your study plan.
  4. Take advantage of all the resources you have. There are many different books, apps, and websites that can assist you in getting a higher GRE score.

In contrast with the GRE, building a strong GPA is more of a long-term process. You have to keep on working hard throughout all four years of undergraduate school to achieve a good GPA. The good news is that you do not need to have a 4.0. Be ambitious but also be realistic when you set out to reach your goal GPA so that you will not lose your motivation. Always keep in mind that you have to meet the requirements of the schools to which you are applying. If you have already tried hard but did not get the GPA or GRE score that you wanted, don’t let this undermine your academic career. You can still impress many programs with a well-written personal statement and by spotlighting research experiences and providing strong letters of recommendation. It is important to remember that many graduate programs, including the top ones such as Stanford University, look at more than just your GPA and GRE score.

Research Experience

  • Start research early. Graduate school admission reviewers expect stellar grades and strong GRE scores. Stand out from the applicant crowd by immersing yourself in research as soon as you think a psychology career might be in the cards for you, says Katherine Sledge Moore, a third-year cognitive psychology graduate student at the University of Michigan.

"Research experience is the best preparation for graduate school, and these days is virtually a requirement," she says.

There are many ways you can find research opportunities before applying to graduate school:

  1. Ask professors from your undergraduate psychology courses if they need research assistants or want to take on independent study students. And completing a senior thesis is a must, she adds, because it shows that you have the ability to conduct an entire research experiment from idea conception to final data analysis.
  2. Get psyched for summer.  Spend your free time over summer break or during afternoons off, for example, working in a research lab or volunteering at a hospital's behavioral health center.
  3. If you are having difficulty finding research opportunities, go to the APA’s PSYCIQ website: http://psyciq.apa.org/psyciq-quick-links-funding-sources/. There you will find search tools for locating grants, funds, internship, and research internships.
  4. Always remember to start early. Do not wait until the first semester of your senior year to look for your first research team. If you start early, you will be well prepared by the time you apply for graduate school.

"In two years, you'll have the substantive amount of work done, maybe even enough to submit for publication, before you apply," she says.

Personal statement

The personal statement is the most important element in your application package. You may have chosen the right schools to apply to, but now you must prove that you are the best fit for their program. Throughout your personal statement, show the recruiters that you have amazing research experiences, abilities, potential, clarity of plan, and writing skills. There are a few things that you should keep in mind while drafting your essays:

  1. Do not use the same statements for all schools. Different programs might have different requirements, which means you have to adjust your statement accordingly to what the programs are looking for.
  2. When you are writing about your goals and experiences, aim for precision and detail. Avoid generic statements.
  3. Proofread your statement many times before submitting it.

Recommendation letter

Most graduate school applications require recommendation letters, often from faculty you've worked for or taken classes with. It is easy to get a recommendation letter, but it takes more effort to get a good one that can impress the recruiters:

  1. Remember to ask the right people. Choose only those who know you and your abilities well, and who won’t simply say you got an A in the class.
  2. Make the process easy for your professor. He or she will appreciate it. Be specific about the program or position you are applying for, and provide an accurate list of your experiences and activities.
  3. Do not forget to show your sincere appreciation. A thoughtful, handwritten thank-you note may increase your chances for a future recommendation should you need one.

We hope that this advice gives you a clearer idea of the application process and what you can do to increase your chances of success. Remember that you have to show the recruiter how special and unique you are. Many applicants have outstanding grades and research experience, so make sure that you stand out to the recruiter with your own story. Applying for graduate schools can be challenging, but APA has tools and resources to assist you on your journey.

The information for this article comes from APA’s Graduate and Postdoctoral Education website:

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11 Jul 2017

Leadership and Communication

In one of his published articles, communication expert John A. Kline said, “If you can’t communicate, don’t try to lead.” But what is effective communication? Effective communication is more than just speaking or writing effectively; effective communication is simply the effective sharing of meaning. And no communication skill is more important than listening. Knowing the basic barriers and shortfalls of communication and doing something about them is a big step in improving our ability to communicate effectively. Kline shares basic insights and real life stories about his lifelong quest to become a better communicator.

Learning Objective
Apply skills that improve my communication skills.

John Kline, PhDPresenter
John A. Kline, (PhD, Iowa 1970) was a college professor, then from 1975-2000 the Air Force expert in Communication and Leadership. In 1986 he achieved Civilian (SES) status equivalent to a two-star general. From 1991 until 2000 he was the Air University Provost with responsibility for faculty, academic programs, libraries, technology, budget and support of 50,000 resident and 150,000 distance-learning students annually. Kline has written several books and many published articles, and is now the Distinguished Professor of Leadership and Director of the Troy University Institute for Leadership Development. He focuses on servant leadership and seeks to make a positive difference in the lives of others.

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07 Jul 2017

APA Teaching Materials for Psychology Teachers

APA Teaching Materials for Psychology Teachers

There are several resources you can use to make your teaching more creative and enjoyable—and we're providing them exclusively here for you.

Classroom Posters

  • Description: APA provides classroom posters for psychology teachers. High-resolution posters are printed at 11x17 inches.
  • Why It’s Great: The posters are created carefully and creatively by the APA. They can help you to demonstrate your idea in a visual way.

Unit Lesson Plans

  • Description: Teachers of Psychology in Secondary School (TOPSS) produces unit lesson plans for high school psychology teachers. Topics include childhood obesity, biological bases of behavior, learning, stress and health promotion.
  • Why It’s Great: Lesson plans are three- to seven-day units that include a procedural timeline, a content outline, suggested resources and activities and references. Unit lesson plans are exclusive to TOPSS members.

Sample Academic Calendars for High School Psychology Courses

  • Description: New high school psychology teachers often ask how to design pacing calendars for their psychology classes. TOPSS also provides some sample calendars for teachers to use and consider.
  • Why It’s Great: They provide examples of actual calendars from other psychology teachers. Courses vary in level, duration, and schedule of the class.

Modules for Teachers

  • Description: 10 modules show how psychological and educational sciences can be applied to practical instructional problems and needs.
  • Why It’s Great: These modules cover many critical issues in education such as bullying, teacher-student relationships, encouragement and so on.

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