17 Jul 2017

Leading and Managing People and Processes

Some leaders and managers focus primarily on the process, task, or mission.  Others focus on the people. Which is best? The military phrase: “Mission First, People Always” says it well.  To be effective, those in charge must focus on both.  Obviously the mission must be accomplished, therefore, the process is important.  However, people complete the processes and ensure the mission is accomplished. Leaders and managers must have a dual focus. Communication and leadership expert John A. Kline, PhD, shares from his experience of managing and leading groups with a handful of people to organizations of thousands.

Learning Objective
Comprehend the importance of maintaining a dual focus on people and processes.

John Kline, PhDPresenter
John A. Kline, (PhD, Iowa 1970) was a college professor, then from 1975-2000 the Air Force expert in Communication and Leadership. In 1986 he achieved Civilian (SES) status equivalent to a two-star general. From 1991 until 2000 he was the Air University Provost with responsibility for faculty, academic programs, libraries, technology, budget and support of 50,000 resident and 150,000 distance-learning students annually. Kline has written several books and many published articles, and is now the Distinguished Professor of Leadership and Director of the Troy University Institute for Leadership Development. He focuses on servant leadership and seeks to make a positive difference in the lives of others.

 

Did you find this presentation useful?

1 0
12 Jul 2017

Tips for Applying to Graduate School

Tips for Applying to Graduate School

Applying to graduate school can be a challenging process that requires effort, patience and time. However, there are many things you can do to overcome your anxiety about the application process. Here are some tips that APA gathered from recruiters and successful graduate students that can help bring you one step closer to acceptance at your dream school.

Find you perfect match

Selecting the graduate program in psychology that is best for you requires thoughtful consideration. First, think carefully about your career goals and training interests, then apply to programs with graduates that succeed in the types of jobs and training programs you are most interested in. In addition, make sure your previous education and training have prepared you for success in the program. As you review graduate programs, ask these questions:

  1. What is the profile of recently admitted students in terms of academic background, standardized test scores, research experience, work experience and demographic characteristics? Your profile should be similar to theirs to help ensure your acceptance to and success within the program.
  2. What is the program's success rate in terms of the percentage of admitted students who graduate, and what is the average number of years they required to do so?
  3. What are the goals and objectives of the program? Do they match your interests and academic preparation as a prospective graduate student?
  4. For programs with an emphasis on academic and research careers, what is the record of graduates' success in obtaining postdoctoral research fellowships, academic appointments or applied research positions outside a college or university setting?
  5. For programs that require an internship or practicum, what is the success rate of placement for students attending the program? What level of assistance is provided to students in obtaining practicum and internship placements?
  6. For programs with an emphasis on professional practice, what is the program's accreditation status (only applicable to clinical, counseling and school doctoral programs)? Are their graduates successful in obtaining licensure, in being selected for advanced practice residencies, and in getting jobs after they finish training?
  7. What types of financial assistance does each program offer?

Graduate school is more of a mentorship program, where students are required to conduct their own research. Therefore, graduate schools look not only for students who will do well in the program, but also for those who will benefit from the program and contribute to the research projects of the schools. Before you apply, make sure that the program is the best fit for you academically and financially. Research the program carefully so that you can find out whether you are the best fit for the program.

Settle Your Score:  GRE and GPA

Most graduate schools seek the best students who will match their programs and offer the most to the field. One approach they use to select these students is to consider students’ GPA and Graduate Record Examination (GRE) scores. Even though these are not the only elements graduate schools use to decide whether a student will be accepted to the program, they are usually the explicit cutoff point. Your awesome recommendation letter or experience will not be considered if your GRE and GPA score is below the required level. There are many things that you can do to prevent yourself from a GRE/ GPA crisis:

  1. Set a goal to get your GPA and GRE scores up to the level that the schools expect you to have. This will offer more opportunity for your recommendation letters and experience to be considered.
  2. It is always smart to start early. You will never realize how difficult and time-consuming the GRE can be until you begin your learning process. Therefore, plan to study for the GRE early, so that you will be well prepared despite other unexpected factors that might affect your plan.
  3. Ask other students to study for the GRE with you. Having a partner can motivate you to be more serious with your study plan.
  4. Take advantage of all the resources you have. There are many different books, apps, and websites that can assist you in getting a higher GRE score.

In contrast with the GRE, building a strong GPA is more of a long-term process. You have to keep on working hard throughout all four years of undergraduate school to achieve a good GPA. The good news is that you do not need to have a 4.0. Be ambitious but also be realistic when you set out to reach your goal GPA so that you will not lose your motivation. Always keep in mind that you have to meet the requirements of the schools to which you are applying. If you have already tried hard but did not get the GPA or GRE score that you wanted, don’t let this undermine your academic career. You can still impress many programs with a well-written personal statement and by spotlighting research experiences and providing strong letters of recommendation. It is important to remember that many graduate programs, including the top ones such as Stanford University, look at more than just your GPA and GRE score.

Research Experience

  • Start research early. Graduate school admission reviewers expect stellar grades and strong GRE scores. Stand out from the applicant crowd by immersing yourself in research as soon as you think a psychology career might be in the cards for you, says Katherine Sledge Moore, a third-year cognitive psychology graduate student at the University of Michigan.

"Research experience is the best preparation for graduate school, and these days is virtually a requirement," she says.

There are many ways you can find research opportunities before applying to graduate school:

  1. Ask professors from your undergraduate psychology courses if they need research assistants or want to take on independent study students. And completing a senior thesis is a must, she adds, because it shows that you have the ability to conduct an entire research experiment from idea conception to final data analysis.
  2. Get psyched for summer.  Spend your free time over summer break or during afternoons off, for example, working in a research lab or volunteering at a hospital's behavioral health center.
  3. If you are having difficulty finding research opportunities, go to the APA’s PSYCIQ website: http://psyciq.apa.org/psyciq-quick-links-funding-sources/. There you will find search tools for locating grants, funds, internship, and research internships.
  4. Always remember to start early. Do not wait until the first semester of your senior year to look for your first research team. If you start early, you will be well prepared by the time you apply for graduate school.

"In two years, you'll have the substantive amount of work done, maybe even enough to submit for publication, before you apply," she says.

Personal statement

The personal statement is the most important element in your application package. You may have chosen the right schools to apply to, but now you must prove that you are the best fit for their program. Throughout your personal statement, show the recruiters that you have amazing research experiences, abilities, potential, clarity of plan, and writing skills. There are a few things that you should keep in mind while drafting your essays:

  1. Do not use the same statements for all schools. Different programs might have different requirements, which means you have to adjust your statement accordingly to what the programs are looking for.
  2. When you are writing about your goals and experiences, aim for precision and detail. Avoid generic statements.
  3. Proofread your statement many times before submitting it.

Recommendation letter

Most graduate school applications require recommendation letters, often from faculty you've worked for or taken classes with. It is easy to get a recommendation letter, but it takes more effort to get a good one that can impress the recruiters:

  1. Remember to ask the right people. Choose only those who know you and your abilities well, and who won’t simply say you got an A in the class.
  2. Make the process easy for your professor. He or she will appreciate it. Be specific about the program or position you are applying for, and provide an accurate list of your experiences and activities.
  3. Do not forget to show your sincere appreciation. A thoughtful, handwritten thank-you note may increase your chances for a future recommendation should you need one.

We hope that this advice gives you a clearer idea of the application process and what you can do to increase your chances of success. Remember that you have to show the recruiter how special and unique you are. Many applicants have outstanding grades and research experience, so make sure that you stand out to the recruiter with your own story. Applying for graduate schools can be challenging, but APA has tools and resources to assist you on your journey.

The information for this article comes from APA’s Graduate and Postdoctoral Education website:

Did you find this article useful?

3 0
11 Jul 2017

Leadership and Communication

In one of his published articles, communication expert John A. Kline said, “If you can’t communicate, don’t try to lead.” But what is effective communication? Effective communication is more than just speaking or writing effectively; effective communication is simply the effective sharing of meaning. And no communication skill is more important than listening. Knowing the basic barriers and shortfalls of communication and doing something about them is a big step in improving our ability to communicate effectively. Kline shares basic insights and real life stories about his lifelong quest to become a better communicator.

Learning Objective
Apply skills that improve my communication skills.

John Kline, PhDPresenter
John A. Kline, (PhD, Iowa 1970) was a college professor, then from 1975-2000 the Air Force expert in Communication and Leadership. In 1986 he achieved Civilian (SES) status equivalent to a two-star general. From 1991 until 2000 he was the Air University Provost with responsibility for faculty, academic programs, libraries, technology, budget and support of 50,000 resident and 150,000 distance-learning students annually. Kline has written several books and many published articles, and is now the Distinguished Professor of Leadership and Director of the Troy University Institute for Leadership Development. He focuses on servant leadership and seeks to make a positive difference in the lives of others.

Did you find this presentation useful?

0 0
07 Jul 2017

APA Teaching Materials for Psychology Teachers

APA Teaching Materials for Psychology Teachers

There are several resources you can use to make your teaching more creative and enjoyable—and we're providing them exclusively here for you.

Classroom Posters

  • Description: APA provides classroom posters for psychology teachers. High-resolution posters are printed at 11x17 inches.
  • Why It’s Great: The posters are created carefully and creatively by the APA. They can help you to demonstrate your idea in a visual way.

Unit Lesson Plans

  • Description: Teachers of Psychology in Secondary School (TOPSS) produces unit lesson plans for high school psychology teachers. Topics include childhood obesity, biological bases of behavior, learning, stress and health promotion.
  • Why It’s Great: Lesson plans are three- to seven-day units that include a procedural timeline, a content outline, suggested resources and activities and references. Unit lesson plans are exclusive to TOPSS members.

Sample Academic Calendars for High School Psychology Courses

  • Description: New high school psychology teachers often ask how to design pacing calendars for their psychology classes. TOPSS also provides some sample calendars for teachers to use and consider.
  • Why It’s Great: They provide examples of actual calendars from other psychology teachers. Courses vary in level, duration, and schedule of the class.

Modules for Teachers

  • Description: 10 modules show how psychological and educational sciences can be applied to practical instructional problems and needs.
  • Why It’s Great: These modules cover many critical issues in education such as bullying, teacher-student relationships, encouragement and so on.

Did you find this post useful?

4 0
06 Jul 2017

Improving Practice Delivery Series

Improving Practice Delivery Series

From the solo practice to the large group practice, whether for profit or not-for-profit, the concepts presented in this series can help strengthen the organization in which services are delivered. *This series is eligible for CE credit. Earn 1 CE credit for each session.

The four 90-minute programs focus on:

How to Create and Implement a Vision for Your Practice

Learn about creating an over-arching vision for your practice and how to use it to guide both clinical and practice/administrative decisions.

Managing Staff and Organizations in Support of Practice Excellence

Learn how to promote excellence in service delivery via employment contracts, policies and procedures, and mentoring to advance staff development.

Expanding the Scope of Your Practice to Address the Needs of the Community

Keep your practice relevant by positioning it to meet the changing needs of the community you serve.

Practice Health Metrics

Keep your practice thriving and growing by tracking your basic metrics (accounts receivables, referral patterns, productivity, etc.), thus assuring the overall health of the practice for the future.

Did you find this web series useful?

1 1
06 Jul 2017

Practice Health Metrics

Practices of any size need to be viable (whether for- or not for-profit) to serve the community. It is essential to track and understand basic metrics to make day-to-day decisions about the practice and to facilitate strategic planning. Assuring the overall health of the practice enables you to provide innovative patient care and service delivery. During this presentation you will learn about:

• Types of measures (accounts receivables, referral patterns, productivity, etc.)
• Keeping it simple, pertinent and doable
• Using a dashboard
• Loss prevention
• Improving patient care
• Strategic planning

Learning Objective 1
Participants will be able to describe different types of practice metrics.

Learning Objective 2
Participants will be able to analyze basic practice metrics.

Learning Objective 3
Participants will be able create or modify a strategic plan based on practice metrics.

ZimmermanPresenter
Dr. Jeff Zimmerman has been in independent practice for over 35 years in solo practice and as founding and managing partner of an inter-disciplinary multi-site group. Dr. Zimmerman is a founding partner of The Practice Institute, LLC. He is President of the Society for the Advancement of Psychotherapy, Division 29. Dr. Zimmerman is co-author of The Ethics of Private Practice: A Guide for Mental Health Clinicians. He is co-editor of a soon to be released book entitled the Handbook of Private Practice: Keys to Success for Mental Health Practitioners and is Editor of Practice Innovations, the journal of Division 42.

Did you find this webinar useful?

0 0
05 Jul 2017

A Collection of Basic Experimental Psychology Articles Booklet

A Collection of Basic Experimental Psychology Articles Booklet
This booklet, A Collection of Basic Experimental Psychology Articles, features articles on some timely topics, including how the Internet inflates people’s estimates of their own knowledge and how mobile technology can be used to crowd source data collection for psychological research.
 
If you enjoy these articles, don’t stop here. APA’s Journals Program maintains a database of hundreds of papers on basic experimental psychology. And as an APA member, you enjoy highly discounted access that enables you to explore these and other research topics online at www.apa.org/pubs/journals.

Did you find this booklet interesting or useful?

8 0
30 Jun 2017

Expanding the Scope of Your Practice to Address the Needs of the Community

Communities have unique needs (e.g., serving veterans, the underserved, disaster relief, health challenges, etc.) which may change over time. Positioning to meet these needs can better serve the community and make your practice relevant. Learn how to address these needs and make them available to your community. During this presentation you will learn the following:

• Incorporating your vision into niche development
• Using research to build a niche
• Niches and managed care
• Ethics and scope of practice (training and mentorship)
• Marketing a niche practice

Learning Objective 1
List practice niches outside of managed care.

Learning Objective 2
Describe how research can be used to build and market a niche practice.

Learning Objective 3
Describe key ethical considerations that need to be addressed when building a niche practice.

ZimmermanPresenter
Dr. Jeff Zimmerman has been in independent practice for over 35 years in solo practice and as founding and managing partner of an inter-disciplinary multi-site group. Dr. Zimmerman is a founding partner of The Practice Institute, LLC. He is President of the Society for the Advancement of Psychotherapy, Division 29. Dr. Zimmerman is co-author of The Ethics of Private Practice: A Guide for Mental Health Clinicians. He is co-editor of a soon to be released book entitled the Handbook of Private Practice: Keys to Success for Mental Health Practitioners and is Editor of Practice Innovations, the journal of Division 42.

 

 

Did you find this webinar useful?

0 0
30 Jun 2017

A Collection of Core Psychology Articles Booklet

A Collection of Core Psychology Articles Booklet

This booklet, A Collection of Core Psychology Articles from APA’s publishing office, drills down into some of the most fascinating topics in the field, from personality disorders to youth violence and homelessness.

If you enjoy these articles, don’t stop here. APA’s Journals Program maintains a database of hundreds of papers on core psychology. And as an APA member, you enjoy highly discounted access that enables you to explore these and other research topics online at www.apa.org/pubs/journals.

 

Did you find this booklet interesting or useful?

30 2
28 Jun 2017

Psychologists Work to Help Communities Adopt, Sustain Evidence-based Treatments

Psychologists Work to Help Communities Adopt, Sustain Evidence-based Treatments
Ten years ago, as a clinical psychology graduate student working at an academic clinic for children with anxiety disorders, Rinad Beidas, PhD, planned to pursue a career running her own lab and identifying treatments that could really help these kids.

"But then I kept seeing kids come to our clinic having already seen lots of different community providers, without getting any better"—most likely, she says, because they weren't receiving evidence-based interventions. What the community had in its toolbox just wasn't working.

But her hope was renewed when children at the clinic participated in an evidence-based treatment for anxiety called Coping Cat, and nearly all of them were able to improve the quality of their lives. That's when Beidas became convinced about the effectiveness of evidence-based practices and the need for them to be more widely available.

"Evidence-based practices need to be available in the community so that kids have access to them and can benefit from them, as a matter of social justice," says Beidas, now an assistant professor of psychiatry at the University of Pennsylvania.

Today, she is one of many psychologists working at the state, county and city levels to make sure evidence-based treatment is available beyond academic medical centers, which aren't accessible to most people. As part of that effort, she sought to find out why more evidence-based practices aren't in wider use. In a study she conducted with clinical psychologist Arthur C. Evans Jr., PhD, commissioner of the city of Philadelphia's Department of Behavioral Health and Intellectual disAbility Services, she found some answers: When it comes to treating children and adolescents with psychiatric disorders, organizational factors—such as the support therapists get from others on the health-care team—are better predictors of the use of evidence-based practices than an individual therapist's knowledge and attitude about therapy techniques (JAMA Pediatrics, 2015).

"Implementation happens at multiple levels," says Beidas, who also directs implementation research at Penn's Center for Mental Health Policy and Services Research. "Even though a provider might be the one in the room with a patient, it's not just about that provider deciding to do an evidence-based practice. It's also about their organization and their supervisor supporting them, and the larger system supporting that process."

Focus on accountability

Serene Olin, PhD, a professor of child and adolescent psychiatry at New York University, is fostering the use of evidence-based treatments in another way: She is exploring how the use of evidence-based practices can help health-care systems establish greater accountability for patient care.

"Care in the real world is so much driven by who pays for what and what you're being held accountable for," she says.

In line with this shift toward more accountability, New York's state mental health department is focusing on what works—and how to train providers in these evidence-based treatments as efficiently and effectively as possible, says Olin, deputy director of New York University's Center for Implementation-Dissemination of Evidence-Based Practices Among States, known as the IDEAS Center. In 2011, the center began training clinical staff to implement evidence-based practices such as the "4 Rs and 2 Ss for Strengthening Families Program," at nearly 350 child-serving outpatient clinics in the state. The trainings vary in intensity, from one-hour webinars to yearlong collaborative learning experiences. The goal is to help clinics develop strong business and financial models, informed by empirical evidence, to ensure sustainability.

The IDEAS research team is using state administrative data to predict who will adopt these business-improvement and evidence-based clinical practices to help the state target its funding. They found that state clinical trainings were more likely to be adopted by clinics with more staff, likely because they're more easily able to release health-care providers for training compared with agencies with smaller staffs. In addition, clinics affiliated with smaller health-care systems were more likely to attend and implement business-practice trainings compared with clinics associated with larger, more efficiently run agencies (Psychiatric Services, 2015). These findings suggest that policymakers should understand the factors that influence the type and amount of training clinics are willing or able to adopt.

Sustaining evidence-based practice

In another effort to understand the use of evidence-based practices in community settings, Anna Lau, PhD, a psychology professor at the University of California, Los Angeles, and Laura Brookman-Frazee, PhD, a University of California, San Diego, psychiatry professor, are working to understand what happens when community therapists are required to deliver these interventions.

According to the American Medical Informatics Association, it can take 17 years for evidence-based practices to trickle down to practice in community-based settings. In a system-driven reform that cuts short that lag time, the Los Angeles County Department of Mental Health is reimbursing contracted agencies for delivering evidence-based practices through a countywide prevention and early intervention initiative. Lau and Brookman-Frazee are investigating how those practices are sustained. The Knowledge Exchange on Evidence-based Practices Study (4KEEPS) examines how community therapists work with evidence-based practices for youth and identifies barriers and facilitators to their implementation with ethnically diverse and disadvantaged communities.

Through the study, Lau and Brookman-Frazee are collecting data from agency leaders and frontline therapists about their experiences implementing six evidence-based interventions for child mental health problems. The pair is studying whether and how these treatments are still being used up to eight years following their adoption.

"We hear a lot about people's concerns that these evidence-based practices aren't equally applicable or equally accessible across different cultural or socioeconomic groups, so we're trying to see if there's evidence of that," she says.

As of September, more than 800 therapists and nearly 200 program managers from 68 agencies have participated in the study with an additional two years of data still to be gathered, says Brookman-Frazee.

"There are huge benefits in learning from what therapists are doing that might inform the intervention development process and allow for a more bi-directional communication process between research and practice," she says.

 

By Amy Novotney


This article was originally published in the January 2017 Monitor on Psychology

Did you find this article useful?

1 0