20 Nov 2017

Executive Function Across the Life Span

This presentation discusses the theory, assessment, and research relevance of tools that can be used for a comprehensive assessment of executive function (EF). It also examines assessing EF using measures of observable behaviors, cognitive processing, and academic performance. Research evidence is presented from a number of assessment tools and resources including:

• The Comprehensive Executive Function Inventory (Naglieri & Goldstein, 2013)
• The Comprehensive Executive Function Inventory—Adult (Naglieri & Goldstein, 2017)
• The PASS neurocognitive theory (Cognitive Assessment System, 2nd ed.; Naglieri, Das, & Goldstein, 2014)
• Social-emotional skills (Devereux Student Strength Assessment; LeBuffe, Shapiro, & Naglieri, 2010)
• Academic skills (Feifer Assessment of Reading and Math; Feifer, 2015, 2017)

Intervention methods are discussed throughout the presentation. Viewers will gain a broad view of EF that can be used to guide assessment and instruction to improve academic and life skills.

jack naglieriSpeaker: Jack A. Naglieri, Ph.D., is Research Professor at the Curry School of Education at the University of Virginia, Senior Research Scientist at the Devereux Center for Resilient Children, and Emeritus Professor of Psychology at George Mason University. He is a Fellow of APA Divisions 15 and 16 and recipient of several awards for his contribution to the field of psychology. Dr. Naglieri is the author or co-author of more than 300 scholarly papers, books, and tests. His scholarly research includes investigations related to topics such as intellectual disabilities, specific learning disabilities, giftedness, and Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder.

This webinar is sponsored by MHS Inc., a leading publisher of psychological assessments for over 30 years.

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20 Nov 2017

How Did You Get That Job? A Q&A with Professor Kimberly Kinzig

The knowledge, skills and experience gained through your psychology training can successfully transfer to a variety of jobs. Dr. Kimberly Kinzig, PhD, uses her training as an instructor and researcher at Purdue University. Learn how you can apply your psychology education to a similar career path.

Kimberly KinzigSpeaker: Dr. Kimberly Kinzig, Ph.D., is an Associate Professor of Psychological Sciences at Purdue University. She teaches undergraduate and graduate courses in behavioral neuroscience. Her research is aimed at understanding the roles of various neuroendocrine signaling pathways in the control of food intake and regulation of body weight, and how these signals and systems go awry in eating disorders and obesity. She has a PhD in neuroscience from the University of Cincinnati, and did her postdoctoral fellowship at Johns Hopkins University in the Department of Psychiatry and behavioral Sciences.

Garth Fowler, PhDHost: Garth A. Fowler, PhD, is an Associate Executive Director for Education, and the Director of the Office for Graduate and Postgraduate Education and Training at APA. He leads the Directorate’s efforts to develop resources, guidelines, and policies that promote and enhance disciplinary education and training in psychology at the graduate and postdoctoral level.

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16 Nov 2017

Melissa Tehee Helps American Indian Students Become Psychologists

Melissa Tehee Helps American Indian Students Become Psychologists
Melissa Tehee
Melissa Tehee is one of fewer than 300 American Indian psychologists in the United States.

Melissa Tehee, PhD, JD, is a proud citizen of the Cherokee Nation. Her cultural heritage as an American Indian is at the center of her life and career. Tehee is one of fewer than 300 American Indian psychologists in the United States, a lawyer, the director of the American Indian Support Project (AISP), and an assistant professor of psychology at Utah State University (USU) in Logan.

This is a fairly new position for her, one she came to precipitously in 2015, but she's pleased to support Indian students who are defying the odds to become psychologists. She knows the distances they've traveled, psychically and often physically as well, to come to school.

There is some financial support through AISP, but Tehee says, "One of the biggest things we do is provide community," making sure someone is available who understands Indian students' viewpoint and is willing to advocate for them. "That's something I struggle with myself in academia, the individualistic approach to things. My life way is more communal," she says.

Of the more than five million U.S residents who claim American Indian heritage, fewer than 25 percent now live on tribal lands. The majority live mostly in cities. In either setting, though, a large minority of Indians are poor, and they are more likely than the general population to suffer from distress and substance abuse. Only about two thirds of American Indian students graduate from high school, and they are more likely to be expelled, suspended or classified as having "special needs" than are other children. According to the latest available data, Indians graduate from college and obtain professional degrees at about half the rate of other Americans, while those aged 25 to 34 are victims of violent crimes at a rate more than 2½ times greater than that of the population as a whole.

The AISP, which seeks to increase the number of American Indian psychologists, was founded at USU in 1986 in response to the dearth of school psychologists and other mental health professionals on tribal lands. It's the rare psychologist who understands the differences between Indian culture and the mainstream American one, Tehee says. In her job with the AISP, Tehee, by training a clinical psychologist, is on a mission to bring more Indians into psychology.

She has her work cut out for her. USU's latest doctoral cohort in psychology is 11 students, a "huge" class, but even with the AISP on-site, focusing its efforts on recruiting Indians for the field, only two of this group are American Indians. "There's not a lot of awareness" in the community about what working as a psychologist would mean, "but the problem begins long before that," with a student population that has a troubled relationship with school, Tehee says.

AISP is trying to smooth the road for those students who have made it to USU. Doctoral candidates now can get clinical hours by traveling the 80 miles to the Urban Indian Center of Salt Lake City, Utah, to do therapy intake, with Tehee supervising. "This is a big step for the AISP program," she says.

Tehee grew up in Nebraska, where her paternal grandfather had settled after serving in the Air Force. He was originally from Tahlequah, Okla., where his Cherokee ancestors were relocated after the infamous 1838 forced evacuation from the Southeast known as the Trail of Tears.  Though he was her only Indian grandparent, Tehee's family identified strongly with his background. "It was who we were, what I heard about," she says. "I always had a different worldview, a slightly different take on things. That difference was pretty obvious for me."

Her parents divorced, and after that, life was often chaotic. The family moved frequently and was even homeless at times. Once, they landed in a domestic violence shelter. School was a refuge, Tehee says, and she excelled there. The first person in her family to go to college, Tehee eavesdropped in high school on other students talking about applying for college, and found out how to apply as well.

As an undergraduate at the University of Nebraska in Lincoln, she sought out Cynthia Willis Esqueda, PhD, also a Cherokee, and was "incredibly fortunate" to work with her on research on domestic violence "and the cultural differences in the way people perceive" those relationships. For a master's degree in psychology from Western Washington University in Bellingham, she investigated mainstream biases toward American Indians with Joseph Trimble PhD. Throughout, she volunteered with domestic abuse hotlines and shelters. The study of traumatic experiences — the coping styles people have or develop, the social support they find, their own resilience and what types of interventions have been shown to help — endures in her present work.

Tehee says she always knew she would be a psychologist, and she was attracted to research from the beginning, but she didn't expect to wind up in academia. "I planned to contract out research projects with tribes," she says. After becoming involved with the Society of Indian Psychologists immediately after completing her undergraduate work in 2005, and attending several of the society's annual meetings at USU, she found herself drawn to the school and the rugged area around Logan, which she came to love.

In 2015, Tehee completed a dual JD/PhD program, with a certificate in Indigenous People’s Law and Policy, at the University of Arizona in Tucson. She did her clinical internship in San Diego, where she worked with couples dealing with the effects of post-traumatic stress disorder on their relationships. Then Carolyn Barcus, EdD, the longtime director of the AISP, decided to retire, and Tehee says, "I got a phone call," one that changed her life. Barcus and USU asked her to take over her job at the AISP, and "that's how it all came about."

She had to scramble then to come up with a career plan. Tehee had worked as a graduate teaching assistant, so she was prepared to teach. However, the Logan area was not home to any Indian tribes. At that point, she says, "I knew my research would have to be on a national scale."

The road to success so far in that regard, Tehee says, has risen out of a network she has found of researchers, not all psychologists, who are working with American Indians.

There's a lot of work to be done, Tehee says. Some tribes have "zero data," but others have been collecting information about their members, and need help putting it to use in a meaningful way — perhaps to get funding for things they're already doing that are working.

Tehee loves the idea that her research projects can give something back to the tribes. "That value, of giving back, is immersed in our culture," she says. "The goal is for all my research to be tribal participatory."

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13 Nov 2017

MonitorLIVE: Exploring New Practice & Income Opportunities for Psychologists

MonitorLIVE: Exploring New Practice & Income Opportunities for Psychologists

Today, nearly 50% of licensed psychologists are in private practice. But as the roles of psychologists evolve, many practitioners are now asking, “How can I enhance my career, make it more rewarding, and earn a good living?”

APA and APAPO challenges practicing psychologists to think more broadly and explore innovative ways to use their skill set and training. We invite you to our upcoming monitorLIVE event to consider your priorities, explore new options, and maximize your professional and financial growth.

Join us on December 5 at 6:00 p.m. ET, at APA’s headquarters in Washington, DC to broaden your definition of psychology practice. Join your colleagues for an evening of intriguing presentations, networking, and light fare as you discover unique ways to grow your practice and supplement your income.

In an on-the-record moderated discussion, eight panelists will:

  • emphasize a diverse range of paths both in and outside of practice, including integrated health care, forensic consulting, parent coordination, niche population work, public office & lobbying, content, partnerships & media, adjunct teaching, and industry consulting
  • share their favorite resources and tools to enhance your career
  • offer tips on how to get involved in your community and professional associations
  • explore additional income opportunities
    and more!

This event is free, but space is limited. Can't attend in person? Watch the live stream (see below).

Topics & Speakers

Parenting Coordination

Giselle A. Hass, Psy.D., ABAP
Clinical & Forensic Psychologist

Giselle Hass is a Licensed Clinical and Forensic Psychologist, and Board Diplomate in Assessment Psychology, who, for the past 25 years, has worked as a forensic expert in family law for local and national courts, specifically in custody and divorce, child abuse and neglect, domestic violence, cross and multi-cultural mental health, attachment, and psychological assessment. She was an Associate Professor in the Clinical Psychology Programs of Argosy University, Washington DC Campus from 1995 to 2010. Dr. Hass is a co-founder of the American Psychological Association Parenting Coordination Program in the DC Superior Court. This program was created to serve the needs of low-income, high conflict families involved in child custody disputes in the District of Columbia. Dr. Hass was the Clinical Director of this program from 2004 to 2009, and is currently a member of the Board of Advisors. She was a member of the APA Task Force to develop the APA Guidelines on Parenting Coordination.

Dr. Hass’ Top Parenting Coordination Resources

Adjunct Teaching

Eddy Ameen, Ph.D.
Director, APA Office on Early Career Psychologists

Dr. Eddy Ameen serves as the inaugural director of the Office on Early Career Psychologists at APA. He has been with APA since 2011, previously the Assistant Director of APAGS. He graduated from Northwestern University with a Bachelor’s degree in Psychology, Boston College with a Master’s in Mental Health Counseling, and University of Miami with a PhD in Counseling Psychology. Outside of his work at APA, he is the board chair of StandUp For Kids, a national homeless youth organization which provides street outreach and other youth services in 17 cities across the US. He also leads a local LGBTQ youth advocacy coalition which has successfully advocated to ban conversion therapy, improve K-12 health education standards, require suicide prevention training of school personnel, and require LGBT cultural competency training of all healthcare providers, all within the District. Additionally, he is an third-year adjunct professor teaching family systems to clinical doctoral students, and he conducts asylum evaluations with Physicians for Human Rights.

Dr. Ameen’s Top Adjunct Teaching Resources

Integrated Health Care

Jessica Winkles, Ph.D.
Pediatric Psychologist

Dr. Winkles is the Pediatric Psychologist at Kenneth M. Klebanow, M.D. & Associates, P.A., a private pediatric primary care practice serving approximately 15,000 patients in Maryland. Dr. Winkles is dedicated to improving behavioral health care accessibility and promoting evidence-based interventions.  She established the practice’s fully integrated Behavioral Health Consultation Service, which delivers screening and brief psychosocial interventions to patients and their families. Her past work includes directing a SAMHSA-funded clinical research program focused on intergenerational stress and trauma at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. She also supervised clinical psychology doctoral students in child assessment at Loyola University Maryland. Dr. Winkles earned her doctorate in Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology from the University of Denver and completed her predoctoral internship in clinical child and pediatric psychology from Children’s National Health System. She earned her undergraduate degree from the University of Virginia.

Dr. Winkles’ Top Integrated Health Care Resources

Content, Partnerships & Media

Mary K. Alvord, Ph.D.
Clinical Psychologist

Mary Karapetian Alvord, Ph.D. is a psychologist and Director of Alvord, Baker & Associates, LLC, a private practice in Maryland. With more than 35 years of clinical experience, she specializes in the treatment of children, adolescents and adults with anxiety and mood disorders, ADHD and problems of self-regulation through individual and group therapy. Adjunct Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at The George Washington University School of Medicine, she trains Psychiatry Fellows in Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT). Dr. Alvord's focus has been on promoting resilience and stress management using strength-based approaches. Co-author of Resilience Builder Program for Children and Adolescents, and two audio CD's: Relaxation and Self-Regulation Techniques for Children and Teens, and Relaxation and Wellness Techniques (adults), she has contributed to the American Psychological Association's (APA) public education guides. Past President of APA Division 46, Society for Media Psychology and Technology, she currently serves as APA's Public Education Coordinator for the Maryland Psychological Association. She frequently appears in the national media. In 2009, Dr. Alvord was honored with the APA's Presidential Innovative Practice Citation. Most recently, she co-authored Conquer Negative Thinking for Teens: A Workbook to Break the Nine Thought Habits That Are Holding You Back and authored an essay in NPR Health Shots.

Dr. Alvord’s Top Content & Media Resources

Organizational Consulting

David W. Ballard, Psy.D., MBA
Assistant Executive Director for Organizational Excellence at APA

Dr. David Ballard serves as Assistant Executive Director for Organizational Excellence at the American Psychological Association (APA). In that capacity, he is responsible for leadership, direction, evaluation, and management of all activities related to APA’s Center for Organizational Excellence, which includes the association’s Psychologically Healthy Workplace Program. Dr. Ballard has provided research, consultation, and training to government agencies, corporations, employer and industry groups, medical schools, and universities in the areas of workplace health and productivity, public health, prevention, and health care finance. He is currently on the Board of Directors of The Health Project / C. Everett Koop National Health Awards and co-chairs the Work, Stress and Health Conference, an international conference co-sponsored by APA, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) and the Society for Occupational Health Psychology. He previously served on the Board of Directors for the Health Enhancement Research Organization and the External Advisory Board for the Mayo Clinic Center for Social Media, as well as on workplace advisory bodies for the National Business Group on Health and Partnership for Prevention. Dr. Ballard received his doctorate in Clinical Psychology and his MBA in Health and Medical Services Administration from Widener University, where he completed concentrations in organizational and forensic psychology.

Dr. Ballard’s Top Organizational Consulting Resources

Government Relations & Advocacy

Craig D. Fisher, PsyD
Senior Legislative and Federal Affairs Officer in the Science Government Relations Office at APA

Dr. Craig Fisher is a Senior Legislative and Federal Affairs Officer in the APA Science Government Relations Office. He advocates for psychological science on Capitol Hill and at the federal science agencies, including the National Institute of Mental Health, the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the Department of Education's Institute of Education Sciences.  He is also the Director of APA's Executive Branch Science Fellowship. Before joining APA, Dr. Fisher was a AAAS Science & Technology Policy Fellow at the National Science Foundation, Office of Legislative and Public Affairs where he engaged key stakeholders about NSF-funded basic research, particularly in social and behavioral science. Previously, he worked as a licensed clinical psychologist in independent private practice in Northern Virginia and at George Mason University's Counseling and Psychological Services where he specialized in cognitive behavioral therapy for patients with anxiety disorders.

Dr. Fishers’s Top Government Relations & Advocacy Resources

Niche Population Practitioner

Michael L. Hendricks, Ph.D., ABPP
Clinical & Forensic Psychologist 

Dr. Michael L. Hendricks is a clinical and forensic psychologist in private practice at the Washington Psychological Center, P.C., in Washington, D.C., and is a Clinical Professor at the George Washington University. Dr. Hendricks is a fellow of the American Psychological Association (APA) and Divisions 12 (Clinical), 42 (Independent Practice) and 44 (LGBT Issues), and a member of Divisions 9 (SPSSI) and 41 (American Psychology-Law Society). He is a past president of Section VII (Clinical Emergencies and Crises) of Division 12 and of Division 44. He was a member of the APA Task Force that developed the Guidelines for Psychological Practice with Transgender and Gender Nonconforming People and currently represents Division 44 on the APA Council of Representatives. He has conducted research with gender diverse people and is the lead author on the seminal paper on the minority stress model for transgender individuals. In 2015, he was awarded an APA Presidential Citation for his work on minority stress and suicide risk among gender diverse individuals. A primary focus of his clinical practice involves work with LGB and gender diverse adolescents and adults.

Dr. Hendricks’ Top Niche Population Resources

Forensic Consulting

Pius Ojevwe, Psy.D., ABPP
Forensic Pscyhologist

Dr. Ojevwe is a Board Certified Forensic Psychologist and a Fellow with American Academy of Forensic Psychology. For the past 12 years, he has worked as a forensic psychologist at local forensic hospitals including Clifton T. Perkins Hospital and Saint Elizabeth Hospital where he conducts a variety of forensic assessments such as competency to stand trial, criminal responsibility, and violent risk assessments. Dr. Ojevwe is an owner of a forensic private practice, COMPASS Mental Health Consultants, LLC, where he provides forensic assessments for juvenile and adults involved in the criminal justice system. He also teaches graduate courses as an associate professor at various local universities including Chicago School of Professional Psychology.

Dr. Ojevwe’s Top Forensic Consulting Resources

08 Nov 2017

Managing Student Loan Debt

This informative webinar covers strategies for loan repayment, financial fitness, and tools to manage your debt. The following topics are discussed:

• Loan repayment and forgiveness programs for all types of psychologists
• Time and money-saving tips for program eligibility
• Strategies for financial fitness and additional support
• Special demonstration of student loan management tool, IonTuition

This webinar is brought to by APA, the Georgia Psychological Association and IonTuition, a web-based service that helps you manage student loan repayment. IonTuition is a available at no charge to all APA members as part of your membership.

Eddy AmeenHost: Dr. Eddy Ameen serves as the inaugural director of the Office on Early Career Psychologists at APA. He has been with APA since 2011, previously the assistant director of APAGS. He graduated from Northwestern University with a Bachelor’s degree in Psychology, Boston College with a Master’s in Mental Health Counseling, and University of Miami with a PhD in Counseling Psychology. Outside of his work at APA, he is the board chair of StandUp For Kids, a national homeless youth organization which provides street outreach and other youth services in 17 cities across the US. He also leads a local LGBTQ youth advocacy coalition which has successfully advocated to ban conversion therapy, improve K-12 health education standards, require suicide prevention training of school personnel, and require LGBT cultural competency training of all healthcare providers, all within the District. Additionally, he teaches a family systems course to doctoral students, and he conducts asylum evaluations with Physicians for Human Rights.

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08 Nov 2017

How Student Loan Interest Actually Works

How Student Loan Interest Actually Works

We've all heard the numbers on student loans, right? Today, the average student loan balance for Americans is over $30,000, and the national student loan debt balance is a staggering $1.4 trillion that keeps growing every day.

But surprisingly, the most important number that many people with student loans aren't even aware of is their student loan interest rate. Typically, borrowers tend to focus on their student loan total rather than the interest rate that's attached to it.

As a personal finance blogger, one of the most common questions that I ask when talking to readers about their student loans is: "What's your current student loan interest rate?"

More than half of the time, readers don’t actually know their rate without having to pull out their loan paperwork!

Understanding what type and amount of interest your student loans carry, and more importantly how it impacts your overall student loan repayment cost, is essential if you're looking to get out of debt quickly.

Here are the most important questions you need to ask about your student loan interest:

How is student loan interest calculated?

Federal student loan interest isn't calculated the same way that interest is calculated on a car loan or a credit card. Those types of debt are typically calculated with compound interest, while student loans use simplified daily interest.

Here's how it works:

Simplified Daily Interest Formula

Simplified daily interest is the type of interest associated with Federal student loans and most private student loans. It's a fairly easy two-part formula.

Daily interest amount = (Current Principal Balance x Interest Rate) ÷ 365.25

Monthly interest amount = (Daily Interest Amount x number of days in the month)

Here's an example of how simplified daily interest works on a $40,000 student loan balance with 6.8% interest:

Daily interest amount = ($40,000 x .068%) ÷ 365.25 = $7.4469

Monthly interest amount = ($7.4469 x 30) = $223.40

So in the example above, a borrower with $40,000 of student loan debt at 6.8% interest will end up paying $223.40 in interest per month (which will vary slightly based on how many days are in the current month).

Is my loan interest rate fixed or variable?

Depending on the type of student loans you have, your interest rate might be either a fixed rate or a variable rate.

Fixed:

If you have Federal student loans in the form of Direct Subsidized Loans, Direct Unsubsidized Loans, or Parent Plus loans, you have a fixed rate that is set by Congress.

If you attended undergraduate or graduate school before July 1st, 2017, go to the Department of Education website here to see interest rate changes over the last decade.

Here are the new Federal interest rates as of July 1st, 2017 for anyone planning to attend graduate school or attain a professional degree:

Direct Unsubsidized Loans: 6%

Parent Plus Loans: 7%

For the life of your loan, these interest rates will not change regardless of interest rate increases or decreases by the Fed.

Variable:

If you hold private student loans or are planning on refinancing in the near future, there is a chance that you will receive a variable interest rate depending on the type of loan you choose.

These are a popular product from banks and student loan lenders because they often have very attractive initial rates compared with fixed interest rates.

However, it's important to understand that variable rates will ebb and flow based on a metric called the "1 month LIBOR average." While variable rates have been low lately due to the current low-interest environment controlled by the Fed, they went up to as high as 10.6% in 1989.

Just because rates have stayed low in recent years, you can never use past indicators to predict future rates. If interest rates were to rise sharply, your monthly loan payment would increase with it. It's important to think long term with your loans and consider if you could actually afford a drastic increase in your monthly payment.

What happens when you pay extra toward your student loans?

When you make your student loan payment every month, the money is applied to your loan in the following order:

  1. Any outstanding fees
  2. Interest
  3. Principal loan amount

This does, unfortunately, mean that any extra payments you make toward your loans won't completely be applied to the principal balance. But don't let that discourage you from paying more than you need to every month!

Even a small amount like $100 or $200 will make a massive dent in your loans, and ultimately save you thousands of dollars over the course of the entire loan (depending on your loan terms).

There are two different strategies that you can use to pay your loans off faster:

The Snowball Method

This method is extremely popular because it yields "quick wins" that tend to motivate people who are hoping to get out of debt sooner.

With the snowball method, you would categorize your loans by the lowest principal amount (regardless of the interest rate), and then attack the smallest loan first.

Once the smallest loan is gone, you take the money that you no longer have to pay toward it and add it to your extra payment amount. Then, you tackle the smallest remaining loan again and repeat the process until all your loans are paid in full.

The Avalanche Method

While this method isn't nearly as popular as the snowball method, it's actually more effective from a time standpoint.

With the avalanche method, you will categorize your loans by the interest rate from largest to smallest. Then, you apply your extra payment toward the loan with the highest interest rate, pay it off, and move down the list to the next loan.

This method doesn't "feel" as fast, but it actually accelerates your loan payoff and reduces the amount that you pay toward interest. This is my preferred debt payoff strategy because it saves you more money in the end.

After talking to thousands of student loan borrowers, I've found that the ones who were the most informed about their loan interest rates and how they work tend to be more aggressive with their debt-payoff goals.

In addition, understanding your loans fully will help to make them seem less overwhelming and ultimately make the process of paying them off less stressful for you.

-- Bobby Hoyt is a former high school teacher who paid off $40,000 of student loan debt in a year and a half. He now runs the personal finance site MillennialMoneyMan.com full-time, and has been seen on CNBC, Forbes, Business Insider, Reuters, Marketwatch, and many other major publications.

The opinions and advice expressed in this article are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect those held by the American Psychology Association (APA).

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07 Nov 2017

Special Report: 10 Trends to Watch in Psychology

Special Report: 10 Trends to Watch in Psychology
Monitor on Psychology, November 2017
Monitor on Psychology, November 2017

More than ever before, there is a growing appreciation for psychologists’ expertise, including the research they do to illuminate human behavior and the treatment and insights they provide to improve health and well-being.

But of course the field’s capabilities go far beyond research and practice—psychology’s ever-multiplying subfields touch on every facet of life. Today’s psychologists are the innovators improving American products and services, from self-driving cars to the health-monitoring apps on our cellphones. They are the trailblazers steering efforts that improve health outcomes and enrich the performance of teams in workplaces nationwide. They are the thought leaders advocating for critical causes, from women’s rights to science-based public policy.

In this special APA Monitor report, “10 Trends to Watch in Psychology,” we explore how several far-reaching developments in psychology are transforming the field and society at large.

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